Android SharedPreferences edit

Commit vs. Apply

The editor.apply() method is asynchronous, while editor.commit() is synchronous.

Obviously, you should call either apply() or commit().

SharedPreferences settings = getSharedPreferences(PREFS_FILE, MODE_PRIVATE);
SharedPreferences.Editor editor = settings.edit();
editor.putBoolean(PREF_CONST, true);
// This will asynchronously save the shared preferences without holding the current thread.
editor.apply();
SharedPreferences settings = getSharedPreferences(PREFS_FILE, MODE_PRIVATE);
SharedPreferences.Editor editor = settings.edit();
editor.putBoolean(PREF_CONST, true);
// This will synchronously save the shared preferences while holding the current thread until done and returning a success flag.
boolean result = editor.commit();

apply() was added in 2.3 (API 9), it commits without returning a boolean indicating success or failure.

commit() returns true if the save works, false otherwise.

apply() was added as the Android dev team noticed that almost no one took notice of the return value, so apply is faster as it is asynchronous.

Unlike commit(), which writes its preferences out to persistent storage synchronously, apply() commits its changes to the in-memory SharedPreferences immediately but starts an asynchronous commit to disk and you won’t be notified of any failures. If another editor on this SharedPreferences does a regular commit() while a apply() is still outstanding, the commit() will block until all async commits(apply) are completed as well as any other sync commits that may be pending.

Feedback about page:

Feedback:
Optional: your email if you want me to get back to you:


Table Of Contents
14 SharedPreferences
39 ACRA
64 Menu
112 Loader
119 Xposed
132 Colors
135 Fresco
140 AdMob
147 Button
156 Vk SDK
170 XMPP
176 OpenCV
200 FileIO
203 Moshi
217 Paint
231 AIDL
241 JCodec
243 Okio
255 Looper
  ↑ ↓ to navigate     ↵ to select     Esc to close