Essential C# Interfaces  Suggest an edit

Why we use interfaces

An interface is a definition of a contract between the user of the interface and the class that implement it. One way to think of an interface is as a declaration that an object can perform certain functions.

Let’s say that we define an interface IShape to represent different type of shapes, we expect a shape to have an area, so we will define a method to force the interface implementations to return their area :

public interface IShape
{
    double ComputeArea();
}

Let’s that we have the following two shapes : a Rectangle and a Circle

public class Rectangle : IShape
{
    private double length;
    private double width;

    public Rectangle(double length, double width)
    {
        this.length = length;
        this.width = width;
    }

    public double ComputeArea()
    {
        return length * width;
    }
}

public class Circle : IShape
{
    private double radius;

    public Circle(double radius)
    {
        this.radius = radius;
    }

    public double ComputeArea()
    {
        return Math.Pow(radius, 2.0) * Math.PI;
    }
}

Each one of them have its own definition of its area, but both of them are shapes. So it’s only logical to see them as IShape in our program :

private static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var shapes = new List<IShape>() { new Rectangle(5, 10), new Circle(5) };
    ComputeArea(shapes);

    Console.ReadKey();
}

private static void ComputeArea(IEnumerable<IShape> shapes) 
{
    foreach (shape in shapes)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Area: {0:N}, shape.ComputeArea());
    }
}

// Output:
// Area : 50.00
// Area : 78.54


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22 Enum
25 GUID
41 Interfaces
107 Stream
108 Timers
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